Burro Books will soon be riding into town!

Finally here I am posting a few morsels following a lengthy time away from this website for which I apologise. The good news is that I have not been idle!

Aside from juggling my books, journalistic assignments and copywriting, I have for some months been establishing my own niche publishing company along with a Mallorca-centric website. This has been a long term project and will come to fruition in September at which point I will be able to share further news and website information.

The new company, Burro Books Limited, will be championing books about Mallorca and Spain, written in the English language (as you’ll maybe know burro means donkey in Spanish and is a much loved animal in Mallorca). Meanwhile, my first crime title, The Devil’s Horn, will be published in January 2019, and the seventh in my travel series, in late Spring the same year.

Next month – July – I shall be off to Western Mongolia on a humanitarian aid expedition (on horseback!) with my old chum, British explorer, Colonel Blashford-Snell, followed by a brief sojourn in Seoul. Whilst in Mongolia, I will be assisting Mongolian zoologists with monitoring wildlife, and assisting with community aid.

Once back, I promise to post more regularly before the new website goes live.

Wishing you all a fantastic summer, and here’s to hoofing it in the hills!

Posted by Anna on 23 June 2018 | 6:53 am

Marathon moments in Palma

Yesterday, despite being a Sunday, I was up at 6.30am and donning my running wear ready for the annual half marathon race in Palma. Some years ago I ran the whole marathon but as the 42km course consists of two quite onerous loops, I decided that once was enough!

A few years after completing the full Palma marathon, I attempted the half and found it very enjoyable. Since then I’ve run marathon courses in different countries, clocking up eight altogether and 19 half marathons. Yesterday made it my 20th so an auspicious day. However, over the last few years I’ve been plagued by back problems so running has had to take a back seat. Still, with help from my physio and Pilates classes and swimming, i’ve finally got my strength back.

As usual the Mallorcan sun was hot but not quite as sizzling as it’s been for other marathon races. All the same the first 12km along Paseo Maritimo and up to Porto Pi zone and back was tough going. Once inside the old town and city, we were afforded some shade by the buildings and trees so the course improved no end.

There was a wonderful sense of occasion with well-wishers of all nationalities lining the course and cheering us on and music playing in the streets. In total 10,000 runners participated from 45 countries with Germany topping the list taking a 36 per cent share. interestingly the average age was 44, showing that running is becoming a popular sport for older people, probably keen to keep up their fitness levels.

Unsurprisingly, only 17 per cent of brave participants attempted the double loop marathon, the rest preferring to run the 21km or 10km races. This has become an important fixture in the Capital’s annual calendar and builds on its own success every year. We need more of these happy, festive and inclusive events that bring so many nationalities together and create a wonderful feeling of harmony and unity. Roll on next year!

Posted by Anna on 16 October 2017 | 4:59 am

Scrumptious fare at Santi Taura of Lloseta

One of my guilty pleasures here in Mallorca is returning again and again to restaurants that awaken all the senses and offer a gastronomic experience that isn’t about pomp, mores and manners but rather focusing on relaxation, warmth of ambience and the food and wine. Friendly, informed and discreet staff go a long way to making the experience special too.

So that’s why one of my favoured boltholes is Santi Taura found in a modest townhouse in the unassuming village of Lloseta. Despite being away from the cut and thrust of Palma life and any of the main tourist hot spots, this intimate and petite restaurant is always completely full and that’s because it has a waiting list for the cognoscenti; those who know their onions from their rognons. It represents exceptional value too.

today I popped by – actually that’s a fib – I stayed for nigh on three hours, savouring appetisers and a five-course exquisite menu del día that included the likes of pumpkin soup, fish croquette, burballes pasta, local white fish, squid and onion, slow cooked black pig with ensaimada, caramelised aubergines, rose ice cream and on and on it went!

I dined with my good chum, Deirdre O’Connor, founder of Mallorcan Tonic that offers great out of season deals at many of Mallorca’s leading hotels. We chose a bottle of Twenty Twelve a deep and delectable ruddy-hued rosé from the organic finca, Es Fangar which is owned by German couple, the Eisenmanns. A combination of Callet, Manto Negro, Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot and Syrah created a memorable crisp wine of huge flavour and delicacy.

Next time I am keen to sample Dins, the rather longer and more indulgent menu offered by the lovely Santi, the eponymous owner, in another hideaway room. But first I’ll need to starve myself for a week!

Posted by Anna on 11 October 2017 | 12:21 pm

Scrumptious Santi Taura Restaurant of Lloseta

One of my guilty pleasures here in Mallorca is returning again and again to restaurants that awaken all the senses and offer a gastronomic experience that isn’t about pomp, mores and manners but rather focusing on relaxation, warmth of ambience and the food and wine. Friendly, informed and discreet staff go a long way to making the experience special too.

So that’s why one of my favoured boltholes is Santi Taura found in a modest townhouse in the unassuming village of Lloseta. Despite being away from the cut and thrust of Palma life and any of the main tourist hot spots, this intimate and petite restaurant is always completely full and that’s because it has a waiting list for the cognoscenti; those who know their onions from their rognons. it represents exceptional value too.

today I popped by – actually that’s a fib – I stayed for nigh on three hours, savouring appetisers and a five-course exquisite menu del día that included the likes of pumpkin soup, fish croquette, burballes pasta, local white fish, squid and onion, slow cooked black pig with ensaimada, caramelised aubergines, rose ice cream and on and on it went!

I dined with my good chum, Deirdre O’Connor, founder of Mallorcan Tonic that offers great out of season deals at many of Mallorca’s leading hotels. We chose a bottle of Twenty Twelve a deep and delectable ruddy-hued rosé from the organic finca, Es Fangar which is owned by German couple, the Eisenmanns. A combination of Callet, Manto Negro, Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot and Syrah created a memorable crisp wine of huge flavour and delicacy.

Next time I am keen to sample Dins, the rather longer and more indulgent menu offered by the lovely Santi, the eponymous owner, in another hideaway room. but first I’ll need to starve myself for a week!

Posted by Anna on 11 October 2017 | 11:30 am

Cheeky Chicks!

It doesn’t matter how many times my hens spawn new broods of baby chicks, I always greet each batch with wild excitement and wonder. I know that a few will sadly perish along the way but I try my utmost to protect them from danger and to give them a fighting chance.

Of course living in the countryside in Mallorca brings all sorts of hazards for a baby chick, not least genets, weasels, rats and eagles and let’s not discuss feral cats roaming about the terrain. In fact it’s quite a miracle that any make it past their first few days of life and yet – hurrah- many do!

Our very raucous and imperious cockerel, Carlos II was – and he should remember this – once a tiny chick at the side of his father, Carlos I. Poor old Carlos I went to meet his feathery maker last year but his spirit lives on along with his lungs, in his cocky offspring. Who could imagine that this towering, crowing and feathery beast was once so vulnerable and small?

So today I celebrated the lives of our new brood and watched in wonder as they hopped about their mother, disappearing under her downy feathers whenever our local eagle made a beady-eyed swift recce of the orchard.

Who can say how many of this latest clan of fluffy little chicks will make it through the night but I console myself knowing that each day of life is precious and that these tiny souls certainly make the most of their time here on earth. Let us raise a toast to mother nature and to our tiny feathered friends everywhere! The world would be so much the poorer without them.

Posted by Anna on 30 August 2017 | 10:16 am